Black Men Arrested at Starbucks Settle for $200,000 Program for Young Entrepreneurs

 

 

 

 

Something positive has come out of the April 12 incident at a Philadelphia Starbucks. The two black men arrested for sitting at the Starbucks without ordering anything, have settled with the world’s biggest coffee-shop chain. The 23-year-old business partners were accused of trespassing after the manager of the Starbucks called the police saying the men refused to buy anything or leave. After spending hours in jail, both men were released, and no charges were filed.

The incident was a major embarrassment for Starbucks because it had an image of a socially conscious company. During the uproar, the CEO Kevin Johnson was in Philadelphia to apologise to the men.

Racial profiling at starbucks to boost entrepreneurship program

Black Men Arrested at Starbucks

Also, the company would be closed on the afternoon of May 29 to train about 175,000 employees in unconscious bias.

The two men agreed with the city on a twin settlement for a symbolic value of $1 each and a promise from officials to set up a $200,0000 program for young entrepreneurs. The settlements are aimed at transforming their community and creating for high school students the types of opportunities that they did not enjoy when they were younger. The entrepreneur program would offer counselling and mentoring to entrepreneurs from Philadelphia high schools.

Roy Carriker (Drexel University) wrote that high school is the most effective place to teach entrepreneurial realities and give students the skills they need before they start their career path. Entrepreneurship has a broader meaning than simply starting an enterprise. It encompasses a habit of mind and is an approach to addressing challenges and risks. Many people may default to be entrepreneurs because of the uncertainties of how one may be able to earn a future living. Many individuals may default to becoming the entrepreneur of their own lives — i.e., self-employed or being more entrepreneurial in some way, never having intended to start something.
Increasingly, it is very easy to envision a future where many will not be traditionally employed job holders, but rather will earn a living by being a multi-tasking “company-of-one.” This might mean earning money by utilising specialised skills or knowledge directly for clients; functioning as an independent contractor doing work arranged through an intermediary agency etc.
People who do this will require the same skills as traditional entrepreneurs: presenting yourself and your ideas, effective/succinct writing, negotiation, self-branding and the basics of running a business. So, it’s increasingly urgent to prepare young people for the possibility that this is how they will earn their living.
Many recent university graduates are already experiencing a challenging job market and troubling underemployment. In polls of recent college graduates, from 41% (April 2013 Accenture Report, Wall Street Journal January 2014, Gallup2013) to 46% (May2014 Accenture Report, Federal Reserve Bank of New York Report) said they were either underemployed or didn’t even need a degree for their current job. It is predicted that AI will replace the solid careers now held by university-educated knowledge workers who use data and set decision rules: accountants, auditors, structural engineers and many others. And in further testament to the underemployment of university graduates, Wall Street Journal online recently reported that 15% of taxi drivers in the US have a college degree, up from less than 1% in 1970. Historically, in developed societies such as the US, completing a high school education has been deemed sufficient to get a job or earn a living. For those aspiring to have a “career” that offers far greater earning potential than just a “job”, a college education or other advanced training was the prescription. Unfortunately, many traditional paths to securing a “good living” including a number involving university education, are slipping away.
The income-earning path chosen as a student departs high school is often a pivotal decision in his or her life, often setting a life-long trajectory. To make such a critical decision, students must have a clear picture of the accelerating changes in the potential for earning a living today and the growing uncertainty of future work. Students must have this knowledge before high school graduation.
High school is the most effective place to teach entrepreneurial realities and give students the skills they need before they start their career path. Historically, in developed societies such as the US, completing a high school education has been deemed sufficient to get a job or earn a living. For those aspiring to have a “career” that offers far greater earning potential than just a “job”, a college education or other advanced training was the prescription. Unfortunately, many traditional paths to securing a “good living” including a number involving university education, are slipping away.
The income-earning path chosen as a student departs high school is often a pivotal decision in his or her life, often setting a life-long trajectory. To make such a critical decision, students must have a clear picture of the accelerating changes in the potential for earning a living today and the growing uncertainty of future work. Students must have this knowledge before high school graduation.
High school is the most effective place to teach these realities and give students the skills they need before they start their career path. Finally, while nobody has figured out how society can deal with technology replacing human endeavour, being the “entrepreneur of one’s own life” provides a mind-set with a greater range of alternatives and skills for dealing with an uncertain future.

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Categories: Entrepreneurship and Small Business

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